eroticReports.com

Erotic Stories - Real, Fantasy, Fetichism & much more! Enjoy your reading.

The History of Dildo

Anonymous

  • Hero Member
  • *****
    • Posts: 1636
    • View Profile
on: June 09, 2019, 03:10:47 PM
The History of Dildo By Aaron







The word dildo is described in Webster's Dictionary as "an object that acts as a substitute for the penis for vaginal penetration". Its etymology is unknown but it was given this name in the sixteenth century. Some believe that it derives from the Italian word "diletto" which means to please. However, dildos were already used in Ancient Greece, when single women used "olisbos", a penis substitute made of wood and lubricated with abundant olive oil. Asians had also been using sex toys for at least 1000 years. In the ancient Middle East they used dildos made from dry camel dung coated with a tough resin. According to this dildo then has a very ancient history and has been used for the same basic function since very distant times.







Some references to the history of dildo can be found when its image appears as a decorative or sculptural element in references to fertility or harvest festivities. Images of the vagina, penis and egg have been obvious choices of mankind when celebrating fertility rituals. In 1955, archaeologists discovered two and three metre high phallic monuments from the Bronze Age (approx. 4000 BC) in Corsica.







The modern dildo is the vibrator. However this does not appear until after the use of electricity spread to the end of the nineteenth century. Curiously, its original appearance was as a medical instrument, which was used for almost 30 years.







Vibrators were widely used in the medical world in the 1890s, when there was an "epidemic" of hysteria among Western women. The symptoms of this disease, which in the past Greek doctors described as the "burning uterus," were multiple, to the point that any form of strange behavior in women was considered hysteria. Anxiety, irritability, sexual fantasies, or "excessive vaginal lubrication" were considered the first symptoms of the disease. The origin of the hysteria was considered to be simply the result of female sexual frustration.







During the nineteenth century women suffering from hysteria had their clitoris massaged by doctors to produce a "hysterical paroxysm", which today we simply call an orgasm. This had been the generally accepted practice for over a thousand years. But in the 1880s, this medical practice became tedious in many cases and the British doctor Joseph Mortimer Granville patented a phallic electromechanical device as a therapeutic tool to perform the "pelvic massage" in an easier, faster and cleaner way.







Of course, pelvic massage did not cure hysteria, and patients had to receive regular medical treatment. It did not take much effort to think that in Victorian times women went to doctors to get the pleasure they did not get at home and that this practice was considered socially acceptable. This behavior was explained by the acceptance of the "androcentric model of sexuality," which considered sex to be exclusively for male penetration and ejaculation.  Since the use of the vibrator was on the clitoris and external to the vagina, it was concluded that there was no sexual contact and that the procedure was purely medical. Certainly, it caused more controversy than the use of the vibrator, the introduction of the speculum and many years later the use of the tampon.







In a 1883 book entitled "Health for Women," the author recommended new vibrators to treat "pelvic hyperemia," or congestion of the genitals. The vibrators were operated with electric current, batteries, pedal, water turbine, air pressure or gas engine and looked more like heavy engineering equipment. They had speeds ranging from 1000 to 7000 beats per minute and their price, in 1904, varied between fifteen and two hundred dollars depending on the model. Some of the earliest models were outrageously expensive, such as the "Chattanooga" model that was sold for two hundred dollars at the end of the nineteenth century. By 1905, however, the vibrators were smaller and cheaper and included several attachments for other domestic uses such as the mixer.







In fact, the vibrator was the fifth household item to be electrified, after the sewing machine, fan, coffee maker and toaster, and preceded in no less than ten years the vacuum cleaner and ironer, as its manufacturers surely adjusted to the priorities of the consumers of their time.







In the mid-twentieth century, dildos and vibrators began to appear advertised in women's magazines and catalogs as "tools for female tension and anxiety. The Sears Roebuck chain of stores described these toys in their mail-order catalogues as "a help that every woman will appreciate. Its use was encouraged as a way to keep women relaxed and happy.







The reign of the vibrator as an instrument of medical offices ended in 1920, when they began to appear in pornographic films and lost their respectability as appliances. On the other hand, medicine had advanced and there was a deeper knowledge about female sexuality. Propaganda about the use of vibrators disappeared from magazines and catalogues.







Between the 20s and 60s there is very little mention of vibrators. In 1949 the use of the vibrator was recommended in a sex manual entitled "The Loving Joy in Marriage" and in similar texts that appeared in 1959 and 1960. Researchers Masters and Johnson used vibrators in their research on sexuality in the 1960s. At the same time, penis-shaped vibrators were sold in sex shops and mail order catalogues, preserving their sordid reputation.







Feminist and sex therapist Betty Dodson says she was the first feminist to recommend to women the use of the vibrator to produce orgasms by stimulating the clitoris. Dodson has successfully taught workshops on female masturbation with vibrators for over 25 years.



Today, electric vibrators are sold in appliance stores as "body massagers" and do not refer to their sexual uses. But at the same time innovations have appeared in the design of the vibrators. Candida Royalle, a well-known porn actress, launched the "Natural Contours" vibrator that has a curved shape to adapt to the shape of the vulva. The Japanese developed a rotary vibrator that became very popular among sex toys. A recent development is the "Fukuoku 9000" vibrator, a small finger-adjustable, battery-powered vibrator much appreciated in the amatory arts. Another recent vibrator on the market is the "Eroscillator" which instead of vibrating up and down, oscillates sideways and brings an attachment to fit the clitoris.







Unlike the first vibrators, the new ones don't come with a mixer. Who knows what manufacturers will be cooking with their modern design software. But what's certain is that they won't be camel dung.


 

SimplePortal 2.3.7 © 2008-2019, SimplePortal